Compiler warnings, Coding standards, Code quality…oh my! (Part 3)

on Jan 12, 10 • by Alen Zukich • with No Comments

In my previous blog post, we talked about the value of compiler warnings and reasons to have source code analysis. Now, I’d like to get into the value of coding standards and touch on how you can fit this altogether. Coding standards are a set of rules or guidelines usually created as part of an ...

Home » Coding Standards » Compiler warnings, Coding standards, Code quality…oh my! (Part 3)

In my previous blog post, we talked about the value of compiler warnings and reasons to have source code analysis. Now, I’d like to get into the value of coding standards and touch on how you can fit this altogether.

Coding standards are a set of rules or guidelines usually created as part of an industry. The goal is simple, provide guidelines, so you can create better code and increase your code quality. Probably the most common coding standard I run into is called MISRA C. This is a standard created for C code in 1998 and revised in 2004. A new standard from MISRA was released in 2008 for C++ code. MISRA was developed for the Motor Industry but has since been adopted by many other industries. Other coding standards such as Joint Strike Fighter are focused on other industries, such as the aerospace world.  And there are more generic types of guidelines, such as the Power of 10, which contains more high level practices.

Either way, these standards cover everything from simply “thou shall comment code” to more specific coding no-no’s. So, how do you apply these to your process?

The advantage of these coding standards is that compliance is something you can quickly scan for using source code analysis. Any source code analysis tool worth its salt incorporates these standards into their issue checkers.

Implementing a solution for developers is key to this process. After developers check to ensure there are no compiler errors (or warnings!) they can run another process (or integrate into your existing process) using source code analysis techniques to find infractions with various coding standards in the code.

Remember that compiler warnings can be very helpful, so use them. Don’t be surprised when your source code analysis vendor asks if you are using your compiler warnings on your next checker feature request. Once you have cleaned up your compiler warnings and you want to take the next step to improve code quality, there are many good coding standards that will bring up the quality of your code. Use source code analysis tools to help you automate this process and you will guarantee a better report card.

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