Where the world talks security – RSA 2016 recap

Where the world talks security – RSA 2016 recap

on Mar 15, 16 • by Larry Edelstein • with No Comments

It seems that everyone attending RSA was looking for ways to mitigate their security vulnerabilities and keep their products, employees, customers, and businesses safe...

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It was a lively RSA conference like it always is. From the monumental booths, to the hallway conversations, there was a lot of discussion and offerings relevant to the Internet of Things (IoT), that network connecting all of our various special-devices together. It seems that everyone attending RSA was looking for ways to mitigate their security vulnerabilities and keep their products, employees, customers, and businesses safe.

At the Rogue Wave booth, we talked to hundreds of people about what they needed for detecting security threats, mitigating cybercrime, and more. Those building embedded devices were concerned about as-yet unknown defects in their code that could lead to future exploits and sought help with their code, so we talked to them about how Klocwork static code analysis could help them root out the weak spots in their software. Application developers, who use hundreds of open source packages, consulted with us on how OpenLogic Support could help them troubleshoot issues, optimized performance, and perform system upgrades on popular packages such as PostgreSQL and Apache Tomcat.

On my trips out to the floor I spotted several intriguing vendors like Dispersive Technologies, who send your packets across a wide variety of paths on the Internet to prevent interception, and Titan IC, who have turned their Helios RegEx Processor into licensable IP for Xlinix FPGAs, where they can be used for content inspection. There is certainly a lot of fascinating technology at this conference, and I’m glad to have witnessed it.

As the conference wrapped for another year, RSA president Amit Yoran noted, “No single preventative measure is going to save us,” yet safeguarding your code against attack should be at the core. Luckily, Rogue Wave can help with that.

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